View The Schedule

Click each day to view the schedule. Sessions are subject to change. 

All main Summit sessions will be available On Demand post event.

The Interactive Roundtable sessions are LIVE only and require a separate free registration. Please click the green buttons to register for the Roundtables of your choice.  

Day 1: Tuesday, March 23, 2021

11:30am
Welcome

Future of the Microbiome Summit Co-Chairs Nathan Gray and Len Monheit will welcome everyone and provide an update on the conference. 

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12:30pm
Innovation and Technological Hall A Beginner

We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually. We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually.We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually.

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1:00pm
Digital World Event Information Hall A Beginner

We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually. We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually.We care for more than 200 thousand exhibits spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million way visitors annually.

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9:00 a.m. ET
Welcome Nathan Gray, Nutraceutic and Len Monheit, Trust Transparency Center

Co-Chairs Nathan Gray and Len Monheit will provide an overview of the Summit and share some market insights on this exploding category. 

9:15 a.m. ET
Gut Microbiome Pattern Reflects Healthy Aging and Predicts Survival in Humans Nathan Price, Institute for Systems Biology & Onegevity Health
The gut microbiome has important effects on human health that are only beginning to be realized and understood.  I will discuss two aspects in particular from our recent findings.  First, is the degree to which important health signals from the microbiome are visible through the lens of microbial-derived metabolites such as can be found in the blood.  Second, I will show evidence that as we age healthily our microbiomes become increasingly unique to each of us, but that shared metabolic transformations by the microbiomes are associated with healthy aging.  This signature was also shown to be predictive of survival up to 4 years in advance in an elderly population.  Our analysis identifies increasing compositional uniqueness of the gut microbiome as a component of healthy aging, which is characterized by distinct microbial metabolic outputs in the blood.
9:45 a.m. ET
Microbiome Connections with Host Metabolism and Habitual Diet from 1,098 Deeply Phenotyped Individuals Francesco Asnicar, PhD, University of Trento

The gut microbiome is shaped by diet and influences host metabolism; however, these links are complex and can be unique to each individual. We performed deep metagenomic sequencing of 1,203 gut microbiomes from 1,098 individuals enrolled in the Personalised Responses to Dietary Composition Trial (PREDICT 1) study, whose detailed long-term diet information, as well as hundreds of fasting and same-meal postprandial cardiometabolic blood marker measurements were available. We found many significant associations between microbes and specific nutrients, foods, food groups and general dietary indices, which were driven especially by the presence and diversity of healthy and plant-based foods. Microbial biomarkers of obesity were reproducible across external publicly available cohorts and in agreement with circulating blood metabolites that are indicators of cardiovascular disease risk. While some microbes, such as Prevotella copri and Blastocystis spp., were indicators of favorable postprandial glucose metabolism, overall microbiome composition was predictive for a large panel of cardiometabolic blood markers including fasting and postprandial glycemic, lipemic and inflammatory indices. The panel of intestinal species associated with healthy dietary habits overlapped with those associated with favorable cardiometabolic and postprandial markers, indicating that our large-scale resource can potentially stratify the gut microbiome into generalizable health levels in individuals without clinically manifest disease. 

 

10:20 a.m. EST
Innovative Prebiotic Mechanisms: The Science of Bacteriophage John Deaton, PhD, Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes

Research on bacteriophages and their role in the balance of the gut microbiome is accelerating, as evidenced by the recent publication of the Gut Phage Database, created by the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the EMBL-EBI. This presentation will highlight the novel prebiotic characteristics of phage, detailing its ability to selectively enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria over unwanted species, along with support from published clinical data showing statistically significant increases in short chain fatty acid-producing bacteria, immune health benefits and more. 

10:40 a.m. ET
Profiling Pathogens in the Preterm Gut Microbiota Lindsay Hall, PhD, Quadram Institute

Initial colonization of the gut by pioneer bacterial species is the first key step for host well-being. The process of initial gut microbiota colonization in preterm babies is radically interrupted due to a variety of factors including mode of delivery and antibiotics. This aberrant colonization of premature infants appears pivotal to the development of a number of diseases, including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is linked to the overgrowth of opportunistic pathogens. Hall will discuss how the use of long-read real-time DNA sequencing platforms and the development of new analysis tools can be used for rapid preterm microbiota profiling and diagnosis of pathogenic NEC-associated bacteria. 

11:05 a.m. ET
Metagenomic Insights of the Infant Microbiome Community David Kyle, PhD, Evolve BioSystems, Inc.

Whether pre-term or full-term, the infant gut microbiome begins to be populated by opportunistic microbes at birth.  Oligosaccharides in human milk (HMO) represent a specialized nutritional source for beneficial bacteria including B. infantis that help prevent colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Through the unintended consequences of repeated antibiotic use, this key protective organism has been lost in most high-income nations. This Infant Gut Deficiency (IGD) is associated with chronic enteric inflammation that elevates the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis in preterm infants, and autoimmune conditions such as eczema, food allergy, asthma, and Type 1 Diabetes later in life.  Infants reconstituted with this natural symbiosis from the first days of life have significantly reduced enteric inflammation. A healthy microbiome needs to be defined on a holistic basis, understanding the beneficial services it is providing to the human host. 

11:30 a.m. ET
Fine Fiber Structure-Microbe Interactions: Implications for Gut Ecology and Precision and Population-Scale Nutrition Stephen Lindemann, PhD, Purdue University

Americans – and those consuming Western diets broadly – consume approximately half of their daily recommended dietary fiber, which is associated with increases in chronic disease burdens. However, dietary fiber, as a category, is a diverse mix of different plant polysaccharide structures that may exert different influences on gut ecology. In this talk, I will consider how differences in fine fiber structure differentially alter gut microbiome structure and function, and how these effects might influence efforts to use these fibers both at population and precision scales.

12 p.m. ET
Interactive Roundtable Breakouts (LIVE ONLY)
12 to 12:30 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: Addressing multiple digestive health conditions through synergistic combinations Samantha Ford, AIDP and Doug Rosendale, PhD, Product Champion, Anagenix

Prebiotic research is now uncovering the importance of selectivity for optimum benefit. In other words, prebiotics that target and feed specific microbial species in the gut can translate to an array of systemic benefits. We will discuss precision prebiotics and their synergies in gut re-composition and how that translates to larger health benefits. 

Please note this is a LIVE only session and will not be available on demand. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras and participate in the discussion. This requires a separate sign-up. Please click here or the button below to register. 

12 to 12:30 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: The Future of Bacteriophage in Support of a Healthy Microbiome Catherine Adams Hutt, RdR Solutions

This interactive session explores the prospective applications of bacteriophage in products for microbiome support, and the realities of bringing such a product to the marketplace. Join the conversation to learn more about the regulatory status and proper positioning of bacteriophage as a prebiotic ingredient in nutritional supplement and functional food products.

Thank you Champion Sponsor Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes for underwriting this roundtable. 

This session does require a separate registration. Please click here or the button below to register. 

Day 2: Wednesday, March 24, 2021

9 a.m. ET
Day 1 Recap and Day 2 Welcome Len Monheit, Trust Transparency Center

Co-Chair Len Monheit will provide a brief recap of day 1 and provide an overview for day 2. 

9:10 a.m. ET
Building Tomorrow’s Microbiome Products: The Contract Manufacturer/Brand Relationship Mark Wright, Health Wright Products & Charles Budinoff, PhD, IFF

Science is continuously evolving in this space and it can be a challenge to incorporate the right ingredients in efficacious doses and produce products that will survive through the end of shelf life. In this case study demonstrating the real connection between an ingredient company and manufacturer, Dr. Budinoff from IFF will share their approach to strain discovery, development and substantiation, and Mark Wright from Health Wright products will provide the practical considerations and questions you should be asking of your contract manufacturing partner.

Thank you Premier Sponsor Health Wright Products for underwriting this session. 

9:40 a.m. ET
Microbiome Commercialization Trends & Disruptive Forces Space Noah Voreades, GenBiome Consulting

In the last five years, the microbiome has broken free of being siloed impacting everything from food & beverage to personalization.  Come learn what key trends are shaping commercialization, will microbiome-based solutions continue to be standalone concepts & potential adjacent sectors that could disrupt the microbiome industry. 

10 a.m. ET
Systems Ecology of the Gut-Brain Axis: The Example of Parkinson’s Disease Paul Wilmes, PhD, Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, University of Luxembourg

The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem, which contributes essential functions to human physiology. Changes to the microbiome are associated with several chronic diseases characterized by inflammation, including neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. Microbiome-derived molecules comprising nucleic acids, (poly)peptides and metabolites are present at high levels in the gut and interface with human physiology including along the gut-brain axis. However, these have so far eluded systematic study. I will discuss how integrated multi-omic analyses combined with human organ-on-chip systems can be leveraged to shine light on this molecular “dark matter” with potential for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic applications in neurological disease, in particular Parkinson's disease.

10:30 a.m. ET
Clinical Findings on Synergies Between Select Prebiotics Jennifer Gu, PhD, AIDP

Thank you to Champion Sponsor AIDP for underwriting this session.

10:50 a.m. ET
Postbiotics: A New Chapter in the Gut and Human Health Hariom Yadav, PhD, Wake Forest University

Postbiotics are functional units of the microbiome that impact host health, and are generally defined as the end products of microbiome – the true active metabolites/end products. However, here, we will specifically talk about the fact that some good bugs in our gut are worthy even when they are dead, since their cellular ingredients can improve host health.

11:15 a.m. ET
Personalization Strategies: Moving Beyond Microbiome Testing Mariëtte Abrahams, PhD, RD, Qina & Maria Kardakova, RNutr, Atlas BioMed Group

From the lab to the boardroom, the concept of personalization in food and health has been one of the hottest topics to be discussed – and hyped – for many years. Yet when it comes to the microbiome, it seems conversations often focus solely on microbiome testing services. In this session, we look beyond testing, to discuss how wider approaches to personalization can play a bigger role in the microbiome space, in addition to looking at how cutting-edge population data can help inform more personalized approaches to science, business, and public health.

12:00pm (NOTE today's session's will start at 12:15 p.m. EDT)
Interactive Roundtable Breakouts (LIVE ONLY)
12:15 to 12:45 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: Challenges and Solutions for manufacturing microbiome products Scott Steinford, Health Wright Products and Sarah Jameson, Health Wright Products

Manufacturing products in this space isn’t simple. It takes expertise and specialization. During this roundtable, experts from Health Wright Products will discuss some of the challenges and opportunities in producing viable products and the questions you need to ask your contract manufacturer to ensure a quality product that meets label claim - every time.

Roundtable Hosts: Scott Steinford, CEO, Health Wright Products and Sarah Jameson, Chief Quality Officer, Health Wright Products.

Please note this is a LIVE only session and will not be available on demand. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras and participate in the discussion. This requires a separate sign-up. Please click here or the button below to register. 

12:15 to 12:45 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: Which Commercialization Trend(s) Will Dominate? Noah Voreades, GenBiome Consulting

In the last five years, the microbiome has broken free of being siloed impacting everything from food & beverage to personalization. Come learn what key trends are shaping commercialization, will microbiome-based solutions continue to be standalone concepts & potential adjacent sectors that could disrupt the microbiome industry.

Hosted by: Noah Voreades, GenBiome Consulting

Please note this is a LIVE only session and will not be available on demand. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras and participate in the discussion. This requires a separate sign-up. Please click here or the button below to register. 

Day 3: Thursday, March 25, 2021

9 a.m. ET
Day 2 Recap and Day 3 Welcome Nathan Gray, Nutraceutic

Co-Chair Nathan Gray will recap Day 2 and set the stage for the final day of the Summit. 

9:10 a.m. ET
Microbiome-Drug Interactions: New Opportunities for Microbiome Science Francisco Guarner, MD, PhD

Drug–microbe interactions are still understudied in the clinical context. Chemical compounds present in drugs or their metabolites can impact microbial composition in the gut and impair their functional contributions to the host. On the other hand, the microbiome plays a clinically relevant role in drug disposition. Pharmacomicrobiomics seeks to understand how inter-individual variations in the microbiome shape drug efficacy and side effect profiles. Multiple bacterial species, genes, and enzymes have been implicated in the biotransformation of drugs. 

9:40 a.m.
Future of Live Biotherapeutic Products: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Regulation Georges Rawadi, PhD, YSOPIA Bioscience; Joseph Simmons, Pharmabiotic Research Institute, Shiri Meshner, PhD, Biomica, Ltd.

There are well-established scientific links between our microbiota and significant health conditions including obesity, autoimmune disease, inflammatory disease, and even cancer. Having been focused on nutrition for so long, many in the microbiome space have spent recent years exploring the potential of therapeutics – creating breakthrough drugs and pharmaceuticals that modulate the microbiome for positive clinical effects.

The commercial and regulatory roadmap for microbiome therapies – and especially LBPs – provides multiple challenges and opportunities for those in the space. In this session, we explore the approaches companies are taking to commercialize microbiome therapeutics.

10:30 a.m. ET
Investment and Innovation: From Knowledge to Commercialization Kara Bortone, JLABS; Jonathan Scheiman, PhD, FitBiomics; Denise Kelly, PhD, Seventure and Brendan Curran, PhD, APC

There has never been a better time to launch a microbiome-focused start-up. Yet for those looking to start a new business, or to commercialize exciting new research, a multitude of challenges remain. From simply knowing ‘where to begin’, to learning about IP and patents, understanding the commercial environment, looking for the right partners, developing your business plan, and securing that all important investment. This session brings together a stellar cast of experts to share their knowledge and experiences in the area – providing useful case studies and tips on turning great science into a great business.

12 p.m. ET
Interactive Roundtable Breakouts (LIVE ONLY)
12 to 12:30 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: The Role of Prebiotics in the Microbiome Space Len Monheit, CEO, Trust Transparency Center and Executive Director of the Global Prebiotic Association

Prebiotics have become the new darling of the microbiome space. During this roundtable, insights will be shared on the market opportunity, the need for appropriate substantiation, and participants will discuss how to make the space grow responsibly.

Table Host: Len Monheit, Executive Director, Global Prebiotic Association

Please note this is a LIVE only session and will not be available on demand. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras and participate in the discussion. This requires a separate sign-up. Please click here or the button below to register. 

12 to 12:30 p.m. ET
Future of the Microbiome Roundtable: Shaping tomorrow: Innovation and Partnering Strategies in the Microbiome Space Kara Bortone, JLABS and Nathan Gray, Nutraceutic

Finding the right innovation partners can be tough. Many start-ups are caught in a catch-22; knowing they need the help of an accelerator to guide them in strategy and help them secure investment, but needing to pitch and often give away equity to do so. This roundtable looks at the challenges faced by those looking to innovate and partner in the microbiome space, and leverages experiences from Johnson & Johnson Innovations JLABS platform to showcase innovative solutions to these problems.

Table Host: Kara Bortone, JLABS and Nathan Gray, Nutraceutic

Please note this is a LIVE only session and will not be available on demand. Participants are encouraged to turn on their cameras and participate in the discussion. This requires a separate sign-up. Please click here or the button below to register. 

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